Powys Playful Schools Programme

oLIVER AT aSHFIELD
oLIVER AT aSHFIELD

press to zoom
aSHFIELD
aSHFIELD

press to zoom
Ashfield Forest school day
Ashfield Forest school day

press to zoom
oLIVER AT aSHFIELD
oLIVER AT aSHFIELD

press to zoom
1/7

Section 11 of the Children and Families (Wales) Measure 2010 places a duty on local authorities to assess and secure sufficient play opportunities for children in their area. The Play Sufficiency Duty comes as part of the Welsh Government's anti-poverty agenda which recognises that children can have a poverty of experience, opportunity and aspiration, and that this kind of poverty can affect children from all social, cultural and economic backgrounds across Wales.

 

As part of the Welsh Play Sufficiency Assessment, administered locally by Powys County Council (PCC) and Powys Association of Voluntary Organisations (PAVO), the three Powys Play Networks; Radnor, Montgomeryshire and Brecknock, have been asked to deliver a ‘Play and Learning mentor supported school improvement programme’. This programme offers support, guidance, accredited training, professional development and project initiatives to address all the areas schools must plan for if they want to strategically and sustainably improve the quality of play.

 

The Playful Powys Schools Programme has been developed to provide help to schools in resolving issues at playtime including, boredom, high levels of accidents and playground incidents, lack of respect for supervisors and a constant stream of low-level behavioural problems. In addition there is a desire to improve the quality of children’s play experiences in school and to further support school leaders to pursue excellence in all areas of school performance.

 

Increasingly children are facing challenges which limit their access to play, especially outdoor play, such as fear of strangers, increasing numbers of cars on the road, building developments on green spaces, the decrease in parks and an upsurge in technology; computers, television and the internet. In this context the need to provide quality play opportunities within schools is increasingly important.